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Archive for the ‘whole grains’ Category

I realize I should probably be starting out with a how-to on feeding a sourdough starter but for now I’ll leave that to the pros like Peter Reinhart and Nancy Silverton


Once you have that figured out, waffles are easy!


I have never come close to matching my mom’s waffles but these are the ones that turn out best for me :: light and airy with just a hint of sourness. 


Sourdough Waffles

2 cups milk 

2 cups whole wheat pastry flour

1 cup white starter, 100% hydration

2 T honey

2 eggs

1/4 cup melted butter

1/2 t salt 

1 t baking soda

Mix milk, flour, and starter. Cover and let sit on counter overnight, 8-12 hours. 

Add remaining ingredients and whisk well. Cool in preheated waffle iron until browned and lightly crisp, about 3-4 minutes. Eat immediately with favorite toppings or store at room temp for a few days. I’ve never frozen them but I’m sure it would work. We heat the leftover ones in the toaster. 

Yield : about 4 large waffles (serves 4)

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I’m a sucker for baked goods with molasses. I just adore the deep, rich flavor. 

These bars don’t disappoint. I’ve made them several times but this last time tried all whole wheat flour. 

These are not an overly sweet bar. I cut back on the sugar quite a bit from the original recipe, which I don’t know where I got. 

A note about the sucanat: when creamed with butter, it takes ages to dissolve so I grind it in an old coffee grinder to a powder before using it.

A delicous snack with a cold glass of milk!

Molasses Raisin Bars

3/4 cup softened unsalted butter

1/4 cup white sugar

3/8 cup brown sugar (I use sucanat)

3/8 cup molasses, part black strap is fine

1 extra large egg

2 1/2 cups whole wheat pastry flour, sprouted if you have it 

1/2 t salt

1 1/2 t baking powder 

3/4 t baking soda

3/4 t cinnamon

1/4 t allspice

Heaping cup of raisins

Cream butter and sugars into smooth. Add molasses and egg and mix well. 

Combine flour, salt, baking powder, baking soda, and spices. Add to creamed mixture along with raisins and mix well. 

Spread into a greased 1/4 sheet pan (or 9×13). Bake at 350 for about 29 minutes or until set in center. Try not to overbake!

Cool in pan before cutting and serving. These freeze well. 

Yield: 20 small bars

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I should have been an Italian Grandmother. 

I’m not sure how those bow ties will cook up but Jada is beside herself with excitement over the prospect of taking them to school in her picnic lunch tomorrow. This week I tried using brown rice flour in my noodles and loved it. Previously when I made 100% whole wheat noodles they were gritty. We ate them but I can’t say we loved them unless they were loaded with sauce. These I enjoy, though. Much smoother!And made with sprouted flour they benefit you, too, unlike boxed pasta products. Now I must return to the kitchen and clean up my mess. And figure out what to go with my noodles for supper. Whole Grain Noodles

2 2/3 cups  sprouted whole wheat bread flour

1 cup sprouted brown rice flour

3 eggs

1 t salt

3/4 cup whey or water

Mix everything and knead for five minutes to make a smooth dough. Cover and let rest for at least 20 minutes. This helps the gluten to relax. 

Divide into two balls and roll each one out to about a 24 inch circle, using flour as needed to prevent sticking. Size will depend on how thick you want your noodles. Let rest again and then cut into desired shape. I use a pizza cutter. 

Cook in boiling salted water and serve immediately. 

If you want to dry the noodles, generously flour and lay out on a cookie sheet to air dry for a few days. If it will be a while til we eat them, I freeze them and then drop straight from the freezer into boiling water. 

Yield: 1 3/4 pounds fresh pasta

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 There aren’t many meals that everyone in the family goes crazy for but ravioli is one of them. Last week I shredded a crockpot beef roast and mixed it with ricotta. This week a cheesy version went over just as well.   

When making pasta, I try to work with as dry of a dough as possible if I’m rolling it out by machine. This is just so the machine doesn’t get gummed up. If I’m doing it by hand, a little wetter dough is necessary otherwise I find it impossible to roll out.   

I found I was overfilling my ravioli and it would stretch the dough and sometimes break. Less is more for this job.   

 A fancy mixer attachment is certainly not needed for this job but it sure does look neat!

 
Three Cheese Ravioli

1 1/4 cup whole milk ricotta cheese

1 cup grated cheddar cheese

1/2 cup fresh grated Parmesan cheese

1/4 t black pepper

2 T fresh chives

2 onions, diced and slowly sautéed (almost caramelized)

1 recipe pasta dough, below

Mix all filling ingredients together well. Fill pasta according to machine instructions or by hand, being careful not to roll the dough to thin. Crimp edges well if doing by hand. 

Cook immediately for 3 minutes in boiling salted water. Serve immediately, or pack into your children’s lunch boxes. (They loved it cold!)

Yield: about 120 ravioli (1 1/4 inch)

Pasta Dough

1 cup white bread flour

1 cup whole spelt flour

1 cup whole wheat bread flour 

1 t salt

2 eggs

1/2 cup water

Mix all together, using more water if necessary. Knead well and roll out to the thickness of a dime. Fill immediately if using for ravioli. 

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So I pressure canned some dried beans the other day. I’ve never done that before. Pressure canned, yes. But not dried beans. 

 I did it in hopes of actually getting my chickpeas totally soft because I don’t like eating gritty hummus.  

 Well, it worked. And I made too much hummus. 
 So I need to find ways to use it up. Not everyone in the family loves the stuff. 

 Chapatis were yesterday’s method and how fun! If you have several small children and the same amount of rolling pins, they will happily do most of the work for you. In fact, they had so much fun that I didn’t have the heart to tell them to stop rolling. Chapatis are supposed to be fairly thick. Oh well. Still yummy!  

Chapatis

1 cup whole wheat flour

1 cup all purpose flour

1 t melted lard or butter 

Pinch salt

1/2 – 3/4 cup water

Butter

Mix flours, fat, and salt. Slowly add water and stir until a soft dough forms. Knead a few minutes to bring the dough together and then cover and let sit 30-60 minutes. 

Divide dough into 10 pieces. Roll each one into 4″ circle. Fry on a hot, ungreased skillet until bubbly and just a bit golden brown, flipping and frying the other side, too. Place in a damp towel after brushing one side with a bit of softened butter. Helps to keep them soft and pliable. 

Serve traditionally with Indian food or with hummus and various toppings, rolled up taco style.

Yield: 10

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  I’m not in my normal kitchen today. The pantry is a bit sparse but don’t worry, we didn’t starve.  I brought along the dry ingredients, premixed, for simple muffins to go with the jar of soup I also toted with us.   The muffins were delightfully simple and satisfying.   The type of fat you use here will really change the end flavor. I used olive oil and loved the slightly earthy undertone it brought. Butter would be delicious, too, of course. Bacon fat or lard could be nice if you want a meaty flavor.  

 And these guys could be the base for a myriad of add-ins. Fruit, veg, protein, take your pick…whatever is floating around in your fridge or pantry! 

 Simple Muffins

1 cup whole wheat pastry flour

1 cup all purpose flour

2 T sugar

1 T baking powder

1 egg 

1 cup milk

1/4 cup fat, melted if necessary 

1/4-1/2 t salt (depending if fat is salted)

In a large bowl, mix flours, sugar, and baking powder. 

In a small bowl, whisk the egg, milk, fat, and salt until combined. Add to dry ingredients and only mix until barely combined, no more. A few lumps are fine. 

Divide between 12 greased and floured muffin cups. Bake at 400F for 12-15 mins or until lightly browned and a toothpick inserted near the center comes out clean. 

Enjoy warm with toppings of choice. 

Yield: 12 regular muffins

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Look!

 It’s here in the flesh! My mom’s cookbook: Baking with Whole Grains. This is a good one, folks. I’m not biased at all, of course. Nope, not at all.

 It was an exciting day when the first box arrived. It was several years in the making and what fun to see it all finished.

 We got to do a lot of taste testing along the way and it was all delicious.

The other day I tried a recipe that I hadn’t tasted before. We weren’t disappointed.

 Perfect for fall and with soup. Won’t you make this for dinner tonight? Pretty please? And then love it and buy the book. You know you want to.

My mom knows a lot about wheat. If you are confused about whole grains, she’ll help you out. I promise. There are tips and tricks for baking everything from yeast breads to muffins. And even a section on what to do with your failures. I love that part.

PS. $20 for a signed copy. You may pick them up at my house or I can mail. Shipping charges apply.
 Apple Cider Spice Bread

From Baking with Whole Grains

2 eggs

1/2 cup apple cider

1/4 cup plain yogurt

2 t vanilla extract

1/2 cup brown sugar

1/4 cup oil

3/4 cup whole wheat pastry flour

3/4 cup whole wheat bread flour

1/2 cup all purpose flour

2 t baking powder

1/2 t baking soda

1 t cinnamon

1/2 t nutmeg

Scant 1/2 t salt

1/3 cup chopped golden raisins (I used regular)

1 cup grated apple

1 t grated orange zest

Whisk the eggs. Add the cider, yogurt, vanilla, brown sugar, and oil. Whisk well and set aside.

In a large bowl, combine flours, baking powder, baking  soda, spices, and salt. Mix and then add raisins, apple, and orange zest.

Add the wet ingredients to the dry and gently stir, blending the dry ingredients up from the bottom. Don’t over mix. A few lumps are fine. Pour into a greased and floured loaf pan.

Bake at 350F for about 45 minutes or until a toothpick inserted near the center comes out clean. Cool 10 minutes before removing from pan. Cool completely before slicing and serving.

Yield: 1 9×5 loaf

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